Martin Luther’s 1517 Disputation Against Scholastic Theology

During my doctoral studies, I first read Luther’s Disputation Against Scholastic Theology. Nearly everyone who studies theology is aware of the fact that Luther was trained in the Scholastic method. They also know that Luther and Protestantism broke with the Roman Catholic Church over doctrines such as sola Scriptura and sola Fide.

However, to my surprise and bewilderment at the time, I was shocked to see that Luther wrote an entire Disputation Against Scholastic Theology. This disputation is clearly not as famous as the 95 Theses; however, one could argue that both are probably just as influential to one’s understanding of Luther’s theology, method, and exegesis. In that same vein, understanding this disputation is also important to understand the specific epistemology, metaphysic, method, and modus operandi of later Protestant theologians (some, but not all). In other words, if anything is clear in the writings and method of some theologians, they were trained in Scholastic theology and they willfully and intentionally broke with that method. … More Martin Luther’s 1517 Disputation Against Scholastic Theology

Greg Bahnsen: Protestant Apologetics (Over and Against the Claims of Roman Catholicism)

Denominational affiliation should not be based upon personal preferences, but upon sustained biblical arguments and convictions. One should not attend a church merely because they enjoy a particular mode or expression of worship. Instead, individuals ought to attend a particular church because they are convinced the doctrines that church teaches are explicitly taught in Scripture. … More Greg Bahnsen: Protestant Apologetics (Over and Against the Claims of Roman Catholicism)

Carl F. H. Henry: The Bible as Propositional Revelation

Carl F. H. Henry claims: The controversy between Protestant orthodoxy and neoorthodoxy focused with special intensity on the issue of the propositional or nonpropositional character of divine disclosure, that is, on whether God’s revelation is rational and objectively true, or whether God’s revelation is noncognitively life-transforming. This has caused some present-day evangelicals and non-evangelicals to ask: … More Carl F. H. Henry: The Bible as Propositional Revelation

Kevin J. Vanhoozer’s Book: Biblical Authority After Babel

Biblical Authority After Babel: Retrieving the Solas in the Spirit of Mere Protestant Christianity. By Kevin J. Vanhoozer. Grand Rapids: Brazos, 2016, vii + 269 pp., $21.99. See the note at the end of the article about the later publication of this article.  Does the Reformation, and sola scriptura in particular, unleash interpretive anarchy upon the … More Kevin J. Vanhoozer’s Book: Biblical Authority After Babel

David Farnell: Lectures on Inerrancy and Historical Criticism

In 1998, John MacArthur wrote the foreword to The Jesus Crisis. “Some of evangelicalism’s best-known theologians,” says MacArthur, “and seminary and college professors are now debating among themselves ideas that would have been deemed entirely nonnegotiable before the last quarter of the twentieth century. Destructive applications of redaction theories, source criticism, literary speculations, and so … More David Farnell: Lectures on Inerrancy and Historical Criticism

Defending Inerrancy: A Response to Methodological Unorthodoxy

Over the past few years there has arisen anew the debate over the total-truthfulness or inerrancy of Scripture. At the core of this debate is whether or not self-professed evangelicals will remain faithful to the historic doctrine of Scripture handed down from the early Church, through the Reformation, and maintained by Confessional Evangelicalism. Below is … More Defending Inerrancy: A Response to Methodological Unorthodoxy